Relevant research and resources related to Presenteeism, educator attendance, and student performance


Academic Research

 

DO TEACHER ABSENCES IMPACT STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT? LONGITUDINAL
EVIDENCE FROM ONE URBAN SCHOOL DISTRICT

Raegen T. Miller, Richard J. Murnane, John B. Willett – Published 2007
http://www.nber.org/papers/w13356.pdf

Abridged Abstract

This paper reports the results of a study of employee absences in education, a large, labor-intensive industry. Policymakers’ concern
with teacher absence rests on three premises: (1) that a significant portion of teachers’ absences is discretionary, (2) that teachers’ absences have a nontrivial impact on productivity, and (3) that feasible policy changes could reduce rates of absence among teachers.
This paper presents the results of an empirical investigation of the first two of these premises; it discusses the third premise. We find large variation in adjusted teacher absence rates among schools. We estimate that each 10 days of teacher absences reduce students’ mathematics achievement by 3.3 percent of a standard deviation.


 

ARE TEACHER ABSENCES WORTH WORRYING ABOUT IN THE U.S.?

Charles T. Clotfelter, Helen F. Ladd, Jacob L. Vigdor – Published 2007
http://www.nber.org/papers/w13648.pdf

Abridged Abstract

Using detailed data from North Carolina, we examine the frequency, incidence, and consequences of teacher absences in public schools, as well as the impact of an absence disincentive policy. The incidence of teacher absences is regressive: schools in the poorest quartile averaged almost one extra sick day per teacher than schools in the highest income quartile, and schools with persistently high rates of teacher absence were much more likely to serve low-income than high-income students. [Teacher] absences are associated with lower student achievement in elementary grades. Our estimates suggest that a policy intervention that simultaneously raised teacher base salaries and broadened financial penalties for absences could both raise teachers’ expected income and lower districts’ expected costs.


 

Market-Based Research

 

A YEAR IN REVIEW: National 2016-17 Employee Absence & Substitute Data.  Frontline Education

https://www.frontlineinstitute.com/uploads/2018/01/FRLI_16_17_Annual_Absence_and_Time_Report-1.pdf

The National 2016-17 Employee Absence Report shares insights from 3,345,182 employees and 46,285,736 absences.
The two-page infographic includes:

  • The average number of absences per employee and how this has changed from 2015-16
  • The most common causes of employee absences in 2016-17
  • The number and percentage of absences that were professionally related
  • Trends in substitute activity across the past two school years
  • Fill rates by day of week and by lead time

 

A YEAR IN REVIEW: National 2015-16 Employee Absence & Substitute Data.  Frontline Education

https://www.frontlineinstitute.com/uploads/2018/01/Absence_Year_in_Review.pdf

 

The National 2015-16 Employee Absence Report shares insights from over 2,733,460 employees and 38,871,571 absences.
The two-page infographic includes:

  • The number and percentage of absences that were professionally related in 2015-16
  • Trends in professionally related absences throughout the 2015-16 school year
  • Fill rates by day of week and by lead time
  • Average numbers of absences by employee